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Healthy Eating – Nutrition for Success

Peak Condition – helping you train harder and smarter – written by Paul Collins

Last month the coaches at Peak Condition put together a Nutrition Night. The primary goal was to give our athletes an idea of what we do day to day to stay health and preform at a high level.

SumoDL355x3 on Vimeo. Unfortunately this was far from a PR but it is progress as of late.

This whole night was started because Quinn (he’s a personal trainer at Peak Condition) and I were talking about our personal approach to eating bacon nutrition in front of a couple clients. After about 5 minutes our client suggested that we offer this information to everyone in the Peak Condition family. A few months later our nutritional night was a great success and we’ve had a lot of positive feedback asking for more similar events. It just goes to show you that bacon can lead to more than just a delicious meal.

Nutrition - Breakfast of choice.

Nutrition – Breakfast of choice.

You might be thinking that this post was just an excuse for me to talk about bacon. Well, you’re right but I also have additional information from the nutrition night that I thought would benefit those who weren’t able to attend.

Flywheel approach to nutrition

My main topic was about what I call the Flywheel approach to nutrition. The basis of a flywheel is that once it gets moving momentum makes it much easier to spin. This “bike” was my first glimpse into the power of the physics of a flywheel.

Nutrition Flywheel

The flywheel approach to nutrition

At the nutritional night I told the story of playing around on this bike (it is actually a stone sharpener for tools) my Dad had in our basement when I was about 8 or 9 years old. The shortened version is that it was extremely hard to get moving. Apparently my 50lb frame didn’t help. However once I grinded out a couple slow rotations it gained speed and after a couple more it was spinning without much effort. Think of it as trying to bike with a gear that is too hard initially but when you get moving it becomes much easier. What does this have to do with nutrition? The flywheel is hard to move and every push matters, not one push is more important than another when getting started. Nutrition is the same way. There isn’t one meal or one type of food that will get you moving or eating for nutritional success. It takes the consistency of healthy eating over multiple meals/days before you have momentum. In addition just like one push didn’t get the flywheel spinning one food won’t make you healthier. There are guidelines that are important but to say blueberries are better than raspberries or kale instead of spinach simply does not make sense.

What are our guidelines?

EAT. WHOLE. REAL. FOOD. PERIOD.

The less processed the better. If you can’t hunt, fish, pluck, grow or ferment it avoid it. The goal is to create a lifestyle not a diet that you plan on ditching in 3 weeks. Batch cooking is an essential part of my nutritional plan. Every Sunday and Wednesday I spend about 2 hours cooking. This process saves me HOURS of time during the week. Instead of eating out every meal I spend 5 minutes in the morning and pack all the food I’m going to eat that day in glass snapware.

Wednesday or Sunday Cooking

Wednesday or Sunday Cooking

Daily Meals

Meals for a day

Keep in mind that I still cook breakfast and dinner at home. I try to leave most of my batch cooked food for when I am at Peak Condition or away from home. As far as grocery shopping one of the most helpful tips I can give someone is to shop the perimeter of the store. Chances are you won’t find anything of value in the frozen food section. Stick to the produce and meat department (ideally free range, grass fed, minimally processed meats).

Funny side story, a couple days after the Nutrition Night I asked my Dad if he remembered the flywheel tool from the basement. Not only did he remember it, he still has it. The photo above is the exact same one I played on as a kid and apparently he still uses it.

For more training/nutritional tips follow us on TwitterGoogle Plus and Facebook. 

By |March 17th, 2014|Athletic performance, Nutrition, weight loss|Comments Off

Schedule it

Recently I finished a book called Managing your Day to Day by Jocelyn K. Glei. Many of the concepts are extremely relevant to entrepreneurs/artists. It discusses strategies for planning your day but it also incorporates an abundance of information about creativity and achieving goals.

ManageYourDay.to.Day

How does this help you? It motivated me to get my day planned out much more efficiently, which means I have more time for writing blog posts to help educate/motivate/entertain you.

What are your primary goals? This can be personal, professional or both. For example, my professional goal was to expand how many clients/athletes are exposed to the science based training environment at Peak Condition, while still providing the best training experience in Portland, Oregon. With the goal in mind you determine what actions need to be taken. Then perhaps more importantly you schedule time for those actions. A simple example just occurred with a PC athlete who has a goal of losing weight. Their action item was to become more active during the day. I told her to schedule 30 minutes of walking during lunch. It’s not complicated but life has a way of getting in the way if you don’t have time blocked off.

I’ve noticed two huge reasons scheduling helps.

Stress management: Just like you experienced in school, the stress of a deadline was often worse than actual doing the project. When you have regularly scheduled time specifically for working towards a goal the stress associated with it disappears. I believe this happens for 2 reasons. One, you know you have time to work on it. When I don’t have time for a project it always raises my stress level. Second, the schedule provides a finite time to work. I’ve found that if you give yourself 3 weeks to get a project done it will take you 3 weeks. Even if it’s really only worth 1 week or sometimes 1 hour of time!

Improved Productivity: This builds a little off having a finite time scheduled for an activity. Our lives are inundated with technological distractions, Facebook, twitter, Instagram, Youtube….the list goes on. My personal distraction is either Superhero trailers (Spiderman, Captain America, X-men) or strength and conditioning continued education. It turns out that scheduling productive time is only half the battle. The other half is resisting distraction. When possible I find it helpful to remove the temptation by writing on paper instead of typing or disconnecting the internet, plus I always put my phone out of reach face down. This way I can’t reactively look at it or see the flashing notification light trying to distract me, because it can wait.

Perhaps the most valuable part of all of this is Happiness (what happens when I read Calvin and Hobbes). Less stress and more productivity always makes me feel better.

“Laziness may appear attractive, but work gives satisfaction.” – Anne Frank

Through his simple process I’ve developed a much better work to life ratio, which in return has helped me with the quality of my life. Instead of wishing there were more hours in the day become more efficient with the time you have. What is your goal? Schedule time for it, determine what steps you need to take and remove distractions. There is a reason we prefer to have all our athletes on a regular schedule for their personal training programs, it works.

More important than food?

Two of the largest factors that affect how I feel and preform is my nutrition and sleep. I’ve found that quality sleep is highly underrated by most Peak Condition athletes. Most people know that food is important, whether or not their nutrition reflects that is anther story. However many don’t appropriate or understand the roll sleep can play.  Theoretically I could live longer without food than sleep. Which reminds me of my first and only attempt to fast.

A couple of years ago after watching the movie 127 hours. I wanted to see what it would feel like to fast. Keep in mind that I am very accustom to eating every 3-4 hours and during this time I was training for an Ironman (looking back this wasn’t the best time to attempt a fast). The day started normal with a 4 am wakeup (which was WAY too early considering I didn’t have to cook breakfast or pack food for the day), road my bike to Strada then started training clients from 5:30 – 11:30am. Now by this time I was fantasizing about food and had a huge case of hangry (hungry and angry). Next I went through a 60 min strength training routine that was pathetic and not just because I was weak from too much cardio but my energy level from a lack of food was brutal. 15 minutes after my workout (12:45) my fast came to a delicious end with a plate of Lebanese food that had never tasted better. It was an epic failure comparable to the Twilight saga.

Despite a negative experience with fasting many people use it effectively for weight loss and every day eating habits. Sleep is another story. I haven’t heard a single athlete come into the facility and say “I feel amazing after only getting a 4 hours of sleep.” Sleep deprivation has a host of correlated effects; increased bodyfat percentage, more issues with insulin sensitivity, impaired cognitive function, and even a disproportionate decrease in lean muscle mass when eating a caloric deficit.

Knowing the potential negative are important but I prefer to focus on the positives. Here are a few things which make sleep awesome.

-          Improves your memory performance and creative problem solving skills.

-          Increase athletic performance.

-          Triggers the release of human growth hormone (HGH), which plays a huge role in muscle and cellular regeneration.

-          Sleep cuts your risk for the common cold and other basic illnesses.

-          Sleep makes you more resilient to daily stress.

When new athletes come into Peak Condition sleep and nutrition are always talked about. If you want to improve all aspects of your health and fitness both are highly recommended. In fact the results will be comparable to transformers + dinobots….

EST

With the recent addition of our Energy System Training (EST) program there have been a lot of questions about what exactly EST is; here is the first of a two-part series to help explain.

Many of the athletes/clients at PC are involved in endurance-based sports, through our strength-training programs they have realized greater success and feel the benefit of increased strength and power. This study gives a perfect example of how endurance sport athletes highly benefit from increased strength and power. However as a Strength and Conditioning coach I can’t ignore the conditioning side of things. Thus the creation of EST.

For the sake of simplicity I’ll say there are three primary Energy Systems that our body uses: alactic, lactic and aerobic. Each is responsible for energy production although how and when they are used is dramatically different.

Alactic – This system is capable of producing the most energy in the least amount of time but it only lasts for a short duration, 5-12 seconds. Power exercises come to mind with this system; for a track analogy, the 100M will represent the alactic system.

Lactic – Energy production with this system involves more chemical processes than the alactic system, consequently it can’t produce energy quite as fast but the duration of sustained energy is slightly longer, 15-90 seconds, think 400M.

Aerobic – While the other two systems can function without oxygen the aerobic system can’t. It’s the least powerful in the short term but it allows us to perform for hour and hours. Even though it’s not the most aerobic activity possible, consider Ashton Eaton’s 1500M performance at the London Olympics to claim gold in the decathlon!

Because the three systems create energy at different rates and durations it’s important to train the Energy System most influential to your training goals or sport, however there can be a lot of cross over between systems. A common mistake is to think that the three systems are either “on” or “off.” This couldn’t be further from the truth. Instead they all contribute to total energy production through almost all periods of exercise. A great example of this is in a 400M sprint where almost 50% of total energy is produced aerobically.  Most people training for “general” fitness will benefit from training all three systems, which will make you a more well rounded athlete or potentially a superhero:

**I am Spiderman of course**

In the last decade the fitness industry has shifted away from steady state cardio for more flashy forms of cardiovascular training (intervals). There are a few driving forces for this:

1. Everyone is too busy. Today’s world is full of instant gratification with no time to waste, unless you count the 10.5 billion minutes spent on Facebook daily…by the way visit Peak Conditions page to see more superhero photos!

2. High injury rates associated with high volumes of steady state cardio (running for most people) have been well documented.

3. A certain injury prone and most of the time careless “hardcore” fitness craze is all about high intensity short workouts. And no it’s not dancing Gangnam style.

Despite the latest fitness craze, all three systems are important to being a balanced athlete.  I call our program Energy System Training because it is intended to condition an athlete or client to be able to meet the energy production demands of their sport or fitness goal. For most sports, training will involve a combination of the three systems sequenced together at the appropriate time.

Part 2 will discuss HOW you train each of the three energy systems…

Signs of a good workout…

Two of the most common requests I get from new clients in regards to their workout is:

I want to sweat and get sore.

My typical response is something along the lines of this…

 

Perhaps that will be my response when gray jumpsuits are back in fashion. However for now I take that opportunity to educate new members of Peak Condition.

Sweating provides some great health benefits such as, improved circulation and increased metabolism; however depending on your personal goals it may not be an important part of your strength training program. For example, a cyclist looking to improve their performance on the bike won’t be lifting with a continuously elevated heart rate and consequently probably won’t be dripping with sweat. Instead they will be working on gaining maximal strength and rate of force development (RFD). Which is achieved with proper programming and in the cyclist’s case involves longer rest periods (60 – 120+ sec).

On the opposite side of the spectrum is someone who doesn’t do any cardiovascular training on their own and needs it in their program. Due to time constraints they won’t be running on the treadmill for 45 minutes, instead I’d program another form of Energy System Training (EST). I use the term EST because there are many different ways to train your cardiovascular system and each way produces a different physiological effect.

The standard method that most people use is steady state cardio or as I classify it the Aerobic Energy System.  However, two additional systems can be trained with “cardio” workouts: Anaerobic Alactic (also known as the Creatine Phosphate System) and Anaerobic Lactic.

I’ll cover EST in another post soon…

In the case of someone needing Aerobic training they definitely should expect to sweat and perhaps even need this headband…

 

Because as my wife said after watching The Avengers with me ”The Hulk is my favorite!” (Which I have to say is amazing and if you have an uncontrollable fascination with superhero’s as I do, it’s a must see.)

Soreness is just as misunderstood as sweating. How fit would you feel if every time you ran/cycled or rock climbed you were unbelievably sore? Yet when it comes to strength training there can be an expectation of just that, soreness that makes it painful to move. I’m all for working out as hard as possible if that is the goal of that workout, however that doesn’t not mean that you’ll always be sore. Here is an example from one of our PC clients:

This client comes in 3 times per week. Consequently she has one day that’s primarily lower body, which is the day I’ll be talking about.

Week 1:

3 Leg exercises (Elevated Dead lifts, Squat to box, Hip Thrusts)

Total Volume (Sets x Reps x Weight): 1260 lbs

Week 2:

3 Leg exercised (Elevated Deadlights, Squat to box, Hip Thrusts)

Total Volume (Sets x Reps x Weight): 1445 lbs

There was an additional 185 lbs of work done during week 2, yet it leads to very little soreness compared to week 1. This is a perfect example of programming enabling more stress (total volume) to be put on the body which is a vital part of developing fitness without creating mass amounts of soreness. Who do you think has more lower body strength?

Stacey: Total Volume of 1260 with A LOT of soreness

Becky: Total Volume of 1445 with very little soreness

Naturally you’d say Becky, however does the lack of soreness decrease the effectiveness? No, in fact it increases it because after week 2 Becky was able to be more active without having soreness slowing her down for a couple days. Which day do you think she got a “better” workout..?

The goal should not be to be sore after every workout. The goal should be to build on your workouts to gradually increase your fitness level, regardless of your specific goals. Keep in mind that working out doesn’t increase your fitness; RESTING is where the increase in fitness is achieved. Workouts break your body down, resting builds them back up. If you are constantly breaking down the muscles with high volumes you won’t give them a chance to rebuild.

 

Consistent success

Putting up big weight loss numbers isn’t easy, however it is achievable. On February 28th Anthony came into Peak Condition with a good friend of his, Travis (a long time PC client). Anthony went through our assessment where I measured range of motion (ROM), stability, strength, cardiovascular function and a couple anthropometric measurements.   With the results of those tests, coupled with Anthony’s goals, I created his unique workout program for the next 8 weeks.

As of today Anthony has been coming to PC twice a week for the last 5 weeks and his results are great!

Total lbs lost: 24
Dialed in nutrition: 2050 calories/day, Fat: 31% CHO: 50% Protein: 19%
ROM deficits: increased Supine Hip Flexion and FABER mobility (more details follow)

 

Now these results weren’t achieved by just doing 2 days a week. Anthony is on a cardio program 4-7 days a week for 45-60 minutes. We alternate his intensity between medium and high to make sure we aren’t over training or just over reaching. Additionally, and probably most important, is the fact that he has been extremely consistent with his workouts and nutritional plan.

This is a perfect example of how dramatic changes can occur when consistency is involved. Working out isn’t about going 110% all the time, instead being consistent and following a program that has varying volumes and intensities will always produce better results. There are entire text books covering the topic of periodization. In fact this is the one I am reading right now:

 

Losing 24 lbs in the last 5 weeks shows that Anthony is following his nutritional plan and getting in his cardio workouts. However, another number that I am extremely excited about is his increased ROM for two tests that needed improvement.

Supine Hip Flexion:

Original measurement:             After 5 weeks:

Left Leg 61                                                                                 Left Leg 80
Right leg 59                                                                               Right Leg 81

 

Hip Faber ROM

faber

Original measurement:              After 5 weeks:

Left Leg 56                                                                                      Left Leg: 60
Right leg 65                                                                                   Right Leg: 65

 

In both cases I am looking for a level of symmetry in addition to total ROM. There are situations where ROM imbalances are warranted and even desired for optimal performance.  However, Anthony isn’t participating in any activities that would require such physiological adaptations, consequently symmetry is more of a focus.

Anthony is a perfect example of consistent hard work paying off in a big way. To learn more about what it takes to have great success check out the Biggest Winner Contest that starts on Saturday.

Results, Faster!

It is your friendly Peak Condition intern here (me, Jonathan) posting on the blog! I’m attempting to make this post informative but not too heavy.

Imagine the perfect workout. It would be quick, easy, and get great results right? Well, there is no easy workout that gets great results but there IS a workout that is quick, gets great results, and will bust your butt in the process. It is called interval training, specifically High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). It is basically a strategy of alternating high intensity exercise followed by recovery. For example, if you perform as many reps of body weight squats as you can in 20 seconds and then follow that with 15 seconds of rest, and repeat – that is an example of High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). The idea is that you expose your body to an intensity it can’t maintain, and then allow yourself a short pause to catch your breath. For everyone from athletes to Biggest Winners (Peak Condition’s team weight loss challenge), and anyone looking for an intense workout, HIIT has a lot to offer.

Until recently, long aerobic workouts, consisting of 30+ minutes of cardio, have been promoted as the best method to reduce fat. While they are definitely a good way to exercise, HIIT has been shown to burn fat more effectively as well as increase your aerobic capacity and muscular strength, with better results compared to steady-state cardio. Additionally, HIIT workouts train muscular strength and speed while participating in steady state cardio (running or cycling) doesn’t. Here is a look at some HIIT methods.

1. Tabata Training: It is a whole body workout that really only consists of 4 minutes of training. It is short and quick but you will be sweating by the end of it. More importantly, it has been shown to actually improve both cardiovascular and muscular fitness. Below is an example Tabata workout, but you can do the same protocol of 20 seconds intense exercise followed by 10 seconds rest, doing any other full body exercise such as squat jumps, plank pushups, or burpees. Go ahead give it a try!

2. The Trapp Study Protocol: I included this because it is from an actual study proving weight loss using a HIIT method. The workout starts by 8 seconds of sprinting on a stationary bike, followed by 12 seconds of easy pedaling, repeating this for 20 minutes. In the study, the group doing this three times per week lost significantly more weight than a group that biked for twice as long at a consistent pace. Although the HIIT workout lasted half the time, it was more effective for weight loss. You could replicate this workout on a running track, elliptical or by alternating exercises such as squat jump, kettle bell swing, burpees, plank pushups, etc.

There are a variety of other HIIT protocols out there but these are two protocols that I specifically researched. I always think it is important to have verifiable information because, it seems, so many in the fitness industry pull their facts out of a hat.

In short, High Intensity Interval Training can be a smart training alternative to just running or biking. The workouts are shorter, more intense, and the payoff can result in greater weight loss and greater cardiovascular & muscular improvement.

 

By |January 30th, 2012|fitness, Personal Training, Strength Training, Training|Comments Off

Choosing a Personal Trainer

If only it was this easy to know if a trainer was worth your time or not…

Texting

I’ve literally seen this while visiting gyms all over the nation. Most commercial facilities will have a couple (if not more) of these so called trainers, who are more interested in technology than their clients.

I love technology (embedding for this video was removed, sorry)

Because every year thousands of people try personal training for the first time, I want to give you a short list of things to look for BEFORE you choose a trainer. If you already have a trainer who does something on this list, the ball is in your court. I’d recommend finding another trainer and following these guidelines:

1 – If they text while a client is working out – You shouldn’t be on your phone while driving and you shouldn’t text while working or training. Simply leave your phone in the car or in the locker room, your trainer should do the same. Make sure your trainer is attentive and listens to you.

2 – Form is always the most important – If you see a trainer letting their client lift with improper form, move on. You are more likely to injure yourself than actually make improvements to your overall health.

I had a hard time watching this whole video,  watching someones form should not evoke bleeding eyes and a strong gag response.

3 – One type of workout – If you see a trainer “training” everyone the exact same way there, is probably a problem. Personal training is exactly that, personal. Your program should have specific drills for you, from dynamic warm-ups to strength exercises. Unless you are in a class or boot camp your workouts should be tailored.

4 – No assessment – If your first session is a brutal workout with no assessment, you most likely did not get a personal workout. Some trainers can quickly assess while others simply don’t assess. You should always go through some kind of assessment before training. This gives the trainer a foundation for creating your program, not just your workout, your program.

5 – Programming not just workouts – If you see a trainer taking their clients through: Foam Rolling (tissue quality work), Dynamic Warm-ups and a Workout, you probably found a keeper.

6 - Certified/Educated – A national certification through NSCA, ASCM or NASM, there are other certifications but these are the big 3 that I value. A degree in Exercise Science, Kinesiology or Physiology are helpful but personally I look for a certification first. Training is a specific skill which isn’t necessarily taught in an undergraduate program.

A short rant, when I was back at the corporate setting I had the joy of watching new trainers start their fitness careers (most were very short). Each month was the same, they all thought it was their job to beat the hell out of their clients. It’s true that one thing people look for when working with a trainer is a good workout. However that is just a part of what a good trainer should be doing. As I mentioned in # 5, there are other elements that need to be added to someones program. If weight loss is your goal, nutrition should be addressed and will represent 70-80% of your success. You simply can never out-work bad nutrition. If all a trainer has to offer is a “hard” workout, you’re missing the boat with total body health the fitness. You can easily find someone to kick your a** but finding a professional that will keep you healthy and address your inefficiencies are worlds apart.

Those are my top 6 recommendations for those of you who are searching for a trainer this New Year. The list could have easily been double but 6 points are easy to remember, plus it’s the best number.

Maximize Your Core Training

The “core” is always being redefined in the fitness industry and probably for good reason. There are a number of components involved: diaphragm, pelvic floor, rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis (TVA), spinal erectors, multifidus, quadratus lumborum (QL) and internal/external obliques. This is not an all encompassing list, but it will be a good starting point.

All these components are responsible for different movements/stabilization, which is why it’s important to train your core in different planes of movement. Unfortunately, most of the time we focus in on just one muscle, the rectus abdominis.

Typical core workout:

For the average gym member a core workout will consist of 500 sit-ups, 5 minutes of biking abs and a finisher of crunches until they can’t sit up and their neck fatigues. Now this might be exaggerated a little. However, I’ve had this routine, or ones very similar, explained to me on multiple occasions. I don’t fault athletes for using these exercises, but I do try to educate the importance of other areas and methods, I’ll get to those shortly.

 Problems with those exercises:

If you’ve ever heard of Dr. Stewart McGill you are well ahead of the curve. He’s the leading expert in low back research and has been for years. He believes that a proper sit up can be done, however it’s incredibly difficult and doesn’t look anything like this:

Here are my biggest concerns with typical sit-ups. Due to our technology based world we spend a lot of time at a computer and sitting in the car, which hasn’t been great for our posture. Then we go to the gym, bench press and do sit-ups, which all compound to create more bad posture, poor breathing patterns and a dysfunctional core. But you thought core training was good?

Core training is extremely beneficial, too many crunches and sit-ups simply aren’t. Doing sit-ups creates specific postural movement patterns. Your rectus abdominis pulls your rib cage down promoting a kyphotic position (hunched over, see picture above), additionally your scapula (shoulder blades) abduct and anteriorly tilt. These two movement patterns alone create a very disadvantageous postural position and many potential tissue problems down the road.

For a simple example, when your scapula abducts and tilts anterior (hunched over), you decrease your shoulders subacromial space, resulting in an increase in shoulder impingement and potentially pain. So, if you have shoulder issues, sit-ups are out. If you’re sitting at your computer and have been for hours, sit-ups are out.

This is just my personal opinion when it comes to excluding sit-ups for my clients training programs. I think there are plenty of other core exercises that come closer to fulfilling the function of the core. Just doing sit-ups neglects the core’s function to: assist with breathing, resist spinal deformation and transfer power between your arms and legs. Instead of just thinking about forward flexion (sit-ups) to train the core, use these categories to help iron out your core training - Anterior, Lateral, Rotary and Posterior. We will focus on the first 3, because most of your posterior training will come from lifting exercises (Deadlifts, RDL, Good-mornings, etc;).

Anterior Core – Ab rollout, Body Saw and Miyagi’s.

Lateral Core – Off Set Farmers Walk, Waiter Walk, Lateral Pallof Press

Rotary Core – Pallof Press, Half Kneeling Pallof Press, Tall Kneeling Pallof Press

All the exercises I’ve shown require that you stabilize the spine and resist any spinal motion. I don’t think you should remove all spinal movement based core exercises, however you have to earn the right to train with motion. It’s been documented that repetitive spinal flexion can lead to disc problems. In fact, forward flexion may be the worst possible motion for your spine. McGill’s recent study examined the role of rotation on disc herniation’s and compared them to repetitive flexion. In short “Axial torque/twist alone was unable to initiate a disc herniation.” Which is good for back health, however there were other potentially negative effects on the spine but forward flexion represented the most disc displacement.

Core training is more than just working on your “six pack.” Remember to train the other categories of core, you’ll have a healthier and happier body.

By |December 15th, 2011|fitness|Comments Off

Success, If You Want It

With the New Year approaching I thought it would be beneficial to talk about success and how to achieve it.

Here it is: 5 things to help you succeed and a little college flash back.

1. Set A Goal:

Churchill’s quote “He who fails to plan is planning to fail,” still rings true today. However, before you can create a plan you need to set a goal. In my world, I see a huge range of fitness goals. It’s normal for us at PC to see a high school athlete, followed by a computer programmer who sits for 14 hours a day. The two have completely different goals and consequently their training will be just as diverse. Their success simply comes down to whether or not they are training effectively for their goals.

 2. Plan:

Here is an example of how not to plan…and we’ve all been there

You know exactly when your college semester is over and when your finals are. That day approaches and your only option is to stay up all night and “study.” You might even pull off a couple A’s with this approach, I know I did, but it was a rare occasion. Your transcript might show an A but you probably won’t retain much if any of the material a week later.

This “plan” is a huge reason why I see so many fitness New Year’s resolutions fail. There is virtually no planning, just a lot of work being done in a short amount of time. The major difference being, you slip back into your previous level of fitness instead of simply forgetting the quadratic equation. This will have a much larger effect on your quality of life vs not remembering,
Quadratic Formula

Now, whether or not I recalled this off the top of my head or simply searched online will remain undisclosed…

3. Progress Check:

It sounds simple and it is, unfortunately this is one of the most underutilized tools in the fitness industry. If a client at PC is training for strength gains we have a set protocol. If your only goal is weight loss we encourage you to add something to that…Why? For most people a weight loss goal alone isn’t enough motivation. There is no deadline or sense of urgency. Knowing that there is a power lifting meet or triathlon scheduled for the end of the month helps keep clients/athletes accountable. If you don’t know how to track your success/progress or create a plan read on…

4. Get Help:

There is obviously an easier way to get around this fence..

Fence

Regardless to what your goal is there will be efficient ways and potentially dangerous methods. Don’t be this guy and get help when you’re not sure what method to use. If weight loss is your goal the Biggest Winner event has had amazing results.

Biggest Winner Sign-up

5. Accountability:

All the goal setting, planning and progress checking still doesn’t equate to success. All of our most successful clients openly talk about their goals and are excited for progress checks. They know we are holding them accountable for their actions, not just in the facility but out in the real world as well. We want to improve their overall quality of life.

It’s always important to realize that your success won’t happen overnight. If you plan and track your progress you’ll have a much higher success rate. For those that need help, find a professional, they should be able to help you reach your goals faster and safer. My next post will be what to look for when choosing a personal trainer, you might be surprised.

What are you current fitness goals and are you tracking them? If weight loss is involved think about signing up for the Biggest Winner.

 

By |December 26th, 2010|fitness|Comments Off